Mental Well-being, Travel & the Brain

On Loss: Neuropsychological Reflections at the Tikal Ruins

Following the robbery in San Marcos, loss was on our minds. We took these feelings to the Tikal ruins in Guatemala. Our brain opioids must still have been low but nevertheless, we felt ourselves rejuvenated, in awe of what Tikal and the jungle have to offer.

Travel & the Brain

Adrenaline Junkies, Meet your Brain: An Article Featured on Wildjunket

A little while back I was lucky enough to have one of my articles about the brain and extreme sports featured on Wildjuket, an inspiring travel blog with a focus on adventure off-the-beaten track. Follow this link to find it.

Travel & Art, Travel & the Brain

Houses of Atitlan & The Neuroscience of Visual Aesthetics

Environmental aesthetics, or the visual appeal of geography and architecture, make up an important part of why we like to travel. On Lake Atitlan, the natural enchantment is amplified by a boat ride which affords views of a string of startling private homes, architectural works of mystical art. In this article I explore why the brain… Read More Houses of Atitlan & The Neuroscience of Visual Aesthetics

Mental Well-being

Big Corn Island, the Neuroscience of Playfulness and ADHD

Big Corn Island off the coast of Nicaragua has a playful spirit. It was infectious. In this article, I’ll talk about the neural underpinnings of playfulness and how the diminished opportunities for play might be contributing to the escalating incidence of ADHD in the youth.

Mental Well-being, Travel & the Brain

The Trouble with Disgust: Moral, Neural and Interpersonal Considerations

There will come a point in most journeys, having removed yourself from your comfort zone, that you find yourself reacting with disgust. This can feel like a rejection of the place and its people themselves. Disgust is an instinctual reaction evolved in the brain to protect you from biological disease. But studies show that this same primitive mechanism is how the brain regulates feelings of interpersonal disgust. … Read More The Trouble with Disgust: Moral, Neural and Interpersonal Considerations

Travel & the Brain

Chilli on the Brain: Why Some Like it Hot

Folklore will tell you that eating chilli is beneficial for your well-being. But is there any truth to this and what exactly does it do? Inspired by the ubiquitous pot of chilli sauce in every Colombian kitchen, here I’ll summarise the real science about the effects of chilli on the brain and body.

Mental Well-being

10 Unexpected Psychological Benefits of Blogging

A few days ago I stumbled across the line marking the first month of this blog. This is novice territory when it comes to blogging, but over this period I’ve done a lot of reflecting and equal amounts of research into the experiences of other more accomplished bloggers. Let me tell you about 10 unexpected… Read More 10 Unexpected Psychological Benefits of Blogging

Mental Well-being, Travel & the Brain

Shearing Water in Playa el Tunco: How Waterfalls and the Crash of the Surf Affect the Way you Think and Feel

Waterfalls and the hypnotic dance of the waves have fascinated humans since the beginning of time. Aside from the spellbinding sensory spectacle, the structural changes to ions in the air, which occurs as water droplets shear apart, have strangely beneficial effects on the biology of the human organism. This article was inspired by our visit to… Read More Shearing Water in Playa el Tunco: How Waterfalls and the Crash of the Surf Affect the Way you Think and Feel

Travel & the Brain

The Traveller’s Dilemma: How Much Planning is Too Much? Insights from the Yerkes-Dodson Law

With travel info on the web overflowing like a garbage heap and lost faith in the Lonely Planet, we find ourselves unsure of how to navigate the tenuous line between too much and too little planning. Encounters with the unknown abide by the Yerkes-Dodson Law – you have to find that sweet spot in the… Read More The Traveller’s Dilemma: How Much Planning is Too Much? Insights from the Yerkes-Dodson Law